For more info:

For a list of all objectives see the VCP5 page.

Objective 4.2 – Create and Deploy vApps

See also this similar post: Objective 4.2 – Create and Deploy vApps.

Identify vApp settings (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 179 and 183). Common settings are:

  • vApp Resources for CPU and memory capacity (Share, Reservation, Reservation type, Limit).
  • vApp Startup and Shutdown Options for the order of the VMs inside the vApp.
  • vApp Properties (in the Advanced Property Configuration)
  • IP Allocation Policy (see later)

Create/Clone/Export a vApp (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 178 and 193) and Build & Manage a vApp. Can also be done from the vSphere Web Client.

Note that the distribution format for vApp is OVF, and the vApp metadata resides in the vCenter Server’s database, so a vApp can be distributed across multiple ESXi hosts. This information can be lost if the vCenter Server database is cleared or if a standalone ESXi host that contains a vApp is removed from vCenter Server. You should back up vApps to an OVF package to avoid losing any metadata.

Add objects to an existing vApp (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 181). Can also be done from the vSphere Web Client.

Note that a vApp can include: VMs, Resource Pools and other vApps.

Edit vApp settings (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 183) and Edit vApp settings. Can also be done from the vSphere Web Client.

Configure IP pools (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 191). Note that the IP allocation options are:

  • Fixed IP: addresses are manually configured. No automatic allocation is performed. No IP pool is needed.
  • Transient IP: addresses are automatically allocated using IP pools from a specified range when the vApp is powered on. The IP addresses are released when the appliance is powered off.
  • DHCP: a DHCP server is used to allocate the IP addresses. The addresses assigned by the DHCP server are visible in the OVF environments of virtual machines started in the vApp.

Suspend/Resume a vApp (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 194 and 195). Can also be done from the vSphere Web Client.

Determine when a tiered application should be deployed as a vApp (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 177) and vApps in vSphere 4, and why they’re very, very useful. Note that vApps requires both a vCenter Server and a DRS license.

For a list of all objectives see the VCP5 page.

Objective 4.1 – Create and Deploy Virtual Machines

See also this similar post: Objective 4.1 – Create and Deploy Virtual Machines.

Identify capabilities of virtual machine hardware versions (new in vSphere 5)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 81) and Virtual Machine Hardware Version 8

Identify VMware Tools device drivers (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See VMware KB: Overview of VMware Tools

Identify methods to access and use a virtual machine console (same as vSphere 4.x)

As usual there is the console in the vSphere Client, and also in vSphere Web Client. But after the guest OS is installed is better choose a network protocol to remote manage the OS (like SSH for Linux or RDP for Windows)

Identify virtual machine storage resources (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 9).

Place virtual machines in selected ESXi hosts/Clusters/Resource Pools (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 29).

Configure and deploy a Guest OS into a new virtual machine (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 33 and 40).

Configure/Modify disk controller for virtual disks (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 36) and Virtual SCSI Adapter type.

Configure appropriate virtual disk type for a virtual machine (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 36 and 121) and VMDK virtual disk type.

Create/Convert thin/thick provisioned virtual disks (same vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 129).

Configure disk shares (similar as vSphere 4.1)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 128). Can also be done from the vSphere Web Client.

Install/Upgrade/Update VMware Tools (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the Guest Operating System Installation Guide.

Configure virtual machine time synchronization (same as vSphere 4.x)

See Timekeeping best practices for Linux guests and Timekeeping in VMware Virtual Machines.

Convert a physical machine using VMware Converter (similar as vSphere 4.x)

The vCenter Server installation does not include any Converter, so you must use the Standalone Converter edition. See also the VMware vCenter Converter Standalone Documentation page. Note that the version 5 is actually in beta phase.

Import a supported virtual machine source using VMware Converter (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See also the VMware vCenter Converter Standalone Documentation page.

Modify virtual hardware settings using VMware Converter (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See also the VMware vCenter Converter Standalone Documentation page.

Configure/Modify virtual CPU and Memory resources according to OS and application requirements (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See What’s New in Performance in VMware vSphere™ 5.0 and Performance Best Practices for VMware vSphere 4.1.

Configure/Modify virtual NIC adapter and connect virtual machines to appropriate network resources (same  as vSphere 4.1)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 107) and Virtual NIC type.

Determine appropriate datastore locations for virtual machines based on application workloads (similar as vSphere 4.x)

There are three options:

  • Store all virtual machine files in the same location on a datastore.
  • Store all virtual machine files in the same datastore cluster (SDRS is needed).
  • Store virtual machine configuration files and disks in separate locations.

About the different choices, they depends of course by the datastore types (which RAID level, number and kind of disks, …), by the workload requirements, the usage of SIOC (if datastore is shared with other VMs, …). But for the VCP5 exam do not expect too much… there are the VCAP exams for more detail about those choices.

Recently, has been released the VCP5 blueprint 1.1 (although in the download is number 1.15?) that cover the official exam (note that the v1.4 was related to the beta exam).

The new blueprint does not include changes on the objectives, just more tools, link to to the documents and some changes in the exam description (the official exam has 85 questions in 90 minutes).

Note that there are also new version of the VCA4-DT (v1.3) and VCP4-DT (v1.2) blueprints.

This is a list of some practice tests for the VCP5 exam:

Note

This product has been discountined with the release 5.1 and replaced by the new VDP.

Disclaimer

I do not work for VMware and I’m not writing that VDR is the best backup product! First versions were affected by some bugs and issues… But now (from 1.2 release) could be one possible backup solution (of course with its limits).

VMware Data Recovery (VDR)

Note that this product works quite like the old esXpress (similar idea to have virtual appliance that handle the backup procedure).

continue reading…

Finally the vSphere 5 download is now available on VMware site:

Also the official documents is now available:

After the recent announce of  new Equallogic storage I’ve notice some tweets that need more  clarifications.

To take advantage of new vStorage API for vSphere you do not need the new storage, but only the firmware that support the required feature:

  • VAAI can be used also in vSphere 4.1 (only in the Enterprise and Enterprise+ editions)  both with firmware 5.0.x or 5.1.x. With the new 5.1 firmware a new version of VAAI is implemented with a new feature for thin provisioning (but in this case it’s also required vSphere 5).
  • VASA can be used only with vSphere 5 and the new 5.1 firmware, but old with a old Equallogic storage (check controller compatibility for the 5.1 upgrade).
  • The new related software, like for example the EqualLogic Host Integration Tools for VMware 3.1, are not strictly required to use Equallogic in a virtual environment or to use vSphere integration.

See also:

Dell announce the new Equallogic array with the introduction of 2.5-inch drive support, providing greater density that enables users to store more in less space. New storage arrays include:

  • EqualLogic PS4100 Series — ideal for small-to-medium businesses or remote office locations with growing storage needs. The SANs, supporting up to 36TB in a single array and 72TB in a single group, can scale as storage demands increase by seamlessly adding additional PS4100 or PS6100 arrays into an EqualLogic group.
  • EqualLogic PS6100 Series — designed to provide mid-sized customers with a scalable storage environment, up to 72TB in a single array and 1.2PB in a single group, that can easily accommodate both high-performance and high-capacity drive options. The PS6100 family is ideal for customers looking for a storage solution to support the storage demands of a highly virtualized data center environment where the seamless movement and protection of virtual machines, applications and data is crucial.

With the newly redesigned, compact form factor, PS6100 customers can achieve the same performance for their typical workload using half the number of arrays, and receive 50 percent more expansion capacity when compared with the previous generation EqualLogic arrays. Customers can gain up to 60 percent performance improvement on typical workloads with the EqualLogic PS Series compared to the previous generation EqualLogic arrays. The new controller type of the PS6100 series has now 8 GB of cache (the PS6000 series has 4 GB and the PS4000 “only” 2 GB).

Those new Equallogic are equiped with the new 5.1 firmware that include new specific API for vSphere integration, like vSphere Storage API – Storage Awareness (VASA) for thin provisioning awareness and new vSphere Storage APIs – Array Integration (VAAI). Note that this improvement are firmware related, so can be applied also to old Equallogic series (if the controller can be upgraded to the new 5.1 firmware).

Dell also has begun shipping the new EqualLogic FS7500, the company’s latest NAS solution that works with EqualLogic PS Series arrays to deliver the only scale-out, unified storage platform for mid-size deployments. The FS7500 uses the Dell Scalable File System, which offers several advanced features including cache monitoring, load balancing and multi-threading for fast I/O processing.

See also:

Official announce: Veeam unveils Veeam Backup & Replication v6, extending leadership in virtualization data protection.

Veeam Software today unveiled major enhancements in Veeam Backup & Replication™ v6.

Probably the most evident new feature is theMulti-hypervisor support (actually limited only to VMware and Windows Server Hyper-V).

Note that the vSphere 5 compatibility is not specified, but the related Storage API are not changed (or not too much) and also the v 5.0.2 works “fine” on vSphere

General availability of v6 is expected in Q4 2011. For more information and updates prior to GA, go to http://go.veeam.com/v6-backup-replication.

In a physical environment usually the term CPU is used to refer to the physical package (or socket). The real processing unit inside this package are called cores (and not that each core can have inside more ALU and can be seen as more logical cores with hyper-threading feature). More CPU usually define a SMP system, more cores a multi-core CPU, more CPU each with more cores a complex system (usually the NUMA architecture is used in this case).

In a virtual enviroment the term vCPU is used to refer to a core assigned to a VM. More vCPU define a vSMP system, similar to a physical system with more CPU each with a single core.

The number of vCPUs can be assigned is determined by the license edition (for more info see http://www.vmware.com/products/vsphere/buy/editions_comparison.html): for all edition except the Enterprise+ was (in vSphere 4.x) 4 vCPU, now (in vSphere 5) is 8 vCPU. For the Enterprise+ edition was 8 and now is 32.

But the number of vCPU can have some impact on guest OS CPU licensing. For example Windows XP or 7 is limited to only 2 vCPUs as “physical” CPUs and can not use more than this limit… But can use more cores.

To get around this limit, it’s possible expose to a VM a more complicated structure where each vCPU has more than one cores. This can be set by and advanced setting in the vmx file. Note that from vSphere 5 this is possible also from graphics interface.

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