For a list of all objectives see the VCP5 page.

Objective 4.3 – Manage Virtual Machine Clones and Templates

See also: Objective 4.3 – Manage Virtual Machine Clones and Templates.

Identify the vCenter Server managed ESXi hosts and Virtual Machine maximums (new in vSphere 5)

See also: Configuration Maximums for VMware vSphere 5.0. Main differences from vSphere 4.1:

  • Virtual Machine Maximums: 32 vCPU (instead of 8 ) and 1 TB vRAM (instead of 255 GB)
  • ESXi Host Maximums: 512 VM per host (instead of 320), 2048 vCPU per host (instead of 512), 2 TB RAM (instead of 1 TB), 256 NFS mounts per host (instead of 64)
  • vCenter Server Maximums: quite the same of v 4.1
  • VUM Maximums: more concurrent operations

Identify Cloning and Template options (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 43).

Different choices for the destination: which cluster or host, which datastore, which VMDK type, perform a customization (guest OS reconfiguration), power on and/or edit the VM Properties.

Clone an existing virtual machine (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 44). Can also be done from the vSphere Web Client.

Create a template from an existing virtual machine (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 47).

Deploy a virtual machine from a template (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 50). Can also be done from the vSphere Web Client.

Update existing virtual machine templates (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 53 and 55).

Deploy virtual appliances and/or vApps from an OVF template (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 68).

Import and/or Export an OVF template (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 68 and 70).

Determine the appropriate deployment methodology for a given virtual machine application (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 15).

VMware has announced that VMworld 2012 US will be back again at the Moscone Conference Center in San Francisco.

The VMworld 2012 conference will run 27th August through to the 30th August 2012.

VMware are announcing this week that there is now a new option (time limited) available for a VCP3 holder to update their certification to VCP5:

  • until the end of Feb, 2012 it’s possible attend at the vSphere 5: What’s New and then simple pass the VCP5 exam.

For more info see the VCP5 official page.

For more info:

For a list of all objectives see the VCP5 page.

Objective 4.2 – Create and Deploy vApps

See also this similar post: Objective 4.2 – Create and Deploy vApps.

Identify vApp settings (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 179 and 183). Common settings are:

  • vApp Resources for CPU and memory capacity (Share, Reservation, Reservation type, Limit).
  • vApp Startup and Shutdown Options for the order of the VMs inside the vApp.
  • vApp Properties (in the Advanced Property Configuration)
  • IP Allocation Policy (see later)

Create/Clone/Export a vApp (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 178 and 193) and Build & Manage a vApp. Can also be done from the vSphere Web Client.

Note that the distribution format for vApp is OVF, and the vApp metadata resides in the vCenter Server’s database, so a vApp can be distributed across multiple ESXi hosts. This information can be lost if the vCenter Server database is cleared or if a standalone ESXi host that contains a vApp is removed from vCenter Server. You should back up vApps to an OVF package to avoid losing any metadata.

Add objects to an existing vApp (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 181). Can also be done from the vSphere Web Client.

Note that a vApp can include: VMs, Resource Pools and other vApps.

Edit vApp settings (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 183) and Edit vApp settings. Can also be done from the vSphere Web Client.

Configure IP pools (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 191). Note that the IP allocation options are:

  • Fixed IP: addresses are manually configured. No automatic allocation is performed. No IP pool is needed.
  • Transient IP: addresses are automatically allocated using IP pools from a specified range when the vApp is powered on. The IP addresses are released when the appliance is powered off.
  • DHCP: a DHCP server is used to allocate the IP addresses. The addresses assigned by the DHCP server are visible in the OVF environments of virtual machines started in the vApp.

Suspend/Resume a vApp (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 194 and 195). Can also be done from the vSphere Web Client.

Determine when a tiered application should be deployed as a vApp (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 177) and vApps in vSphere 4, and why they’re very, very useful. Note that vApps requires both a vCenter Server and a DRS license.

For a list of all objectives see the VCP5 page.

Objective 4.1 – Create and Deploy Virtual Machines

See also this similar post: Objective 4.1 – Create and Deploy Virtual Machines.

Identify capabilities of virtual machine hardware versions (new in vSphere 5)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 81) and Virtual Machine Hardware Version 8

Identify VMware Tools device drivers (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See VMware KB: Overview of VMware Tools

Identify methods to access and use a virtual machine console (same as vSphere 4.x)

As usual there is the console in the vSphere Client, and also in vSphere Web Client. But after the guest OS is installed is better choose a network protocol to remote manage the OS (like SSH for Linux or RDP for Windows)

Identify virtual machine storage resources (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 9).

Place virtual machines in selected ESXi hosts/Clusters/Resource Pools (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 29).

Configure and deploy a Guest OS into a new virtual machine (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 33 and 40).

Configure/Modify disk controller for virtual disks (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 36) and Virtual SCSI Adapter type.

Configure appropriate virtual disk type for a virtual machine (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 36 and 121) and VMDK virtual disk type.

Create/Convert thin/thick provisioned virtual disks (same vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 129).

Configure disk shares (similar as vSphere 4.1)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 128). Can also be done from the vSphere Web Client.

Install/Upgrade/Update VMware Tools (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the Guest Operating System Installation Guide.

Configure virtual machine time synchronization (same as vSphere 4.x)

See Timekeeping best practices for Linux guests and Timekeeping in VMware Virtual Machines.

Convert a physical machine using VMware Converter (similar as vSphere 4.x)

The vCenter Server installation does not include any Converter, so you must use the Standalone Converter edition. See also the VMware vCenter Converter Standalone Documentation page. Note that the version 5 is actually in beta phase.

Import a supported virtual machine source using VMware Converter (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See also the VMware vCenter Converter Standalone Documentation page.

Modify virtual hardware settings using VMware Converter (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See also the VMware vCenter Converter Standalone Documentation page.

Configure/Modify virtual CPU and Memory resources according to OS and application requirements (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See What’s New in Performance in VMware vSphere™ 5.0 and Performance Best Practices for VMware vSphere 4.1.

Configure/Modify virtual NIC adapter and connect virtual machines to appropriate network resources (same  as vSphere 4.1)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 107) and Virtual NIC type.

Determine appropriate datastore locations for virtual machines based on application workloads (similar as vSphere 4.x)

There are three options:

  • Store all virtual machine files in the same location on a datastore.
  • Store all virtual machine files in the same datastore cluster (SDRS is needed).
  • Store virtual machine configuration files and disks in separate locations.

About the different choices, they depends of course by the datastore types (which RAID level, number and kind of disks, …), by the workload requirements, the usage of SIOC (if datastore is shared with other VMs, …). But for the VCP5 exam do not expect too much… there are the VCAP exams for more detail about those choices.

Recently, has been released the VCP5 blueprint 1.1 (although in the download is number 1.15?) that cover the official exam (note that the v1.4 was related to the beta exam).

The new blueprint does not include changes on the objectives, just more tools, link to to the documents and some changes in the exam description (the official exam has 85 questions in 90 minutes).

Note that there are also new version of the VCA4-DT (v1.3) and VCP4-DT (v1.2) blueprints.

This is a list of some practice tests for the VCP5 exam:

Note

This product has been discountined with the release 5.1 and replaced by the new VDP.

Disclaimer

I do not work for VMware and I’m not writing that VDR is the best backup product! First versions were affected by some bugs and issues… But now (from 1.2 release) could be one possible backup solution (of course with its limits).

VMware Data Recovery (VDR)

Note that this product works quite like the old esXpress (similar idea to have virtual appliance that handle the backup procedure).

continue reading…

Finally the vSphere 5 download is now available on VMware site:

Also the official documents is now available:

After the recent announce of  new Equallogic storage I’ve notice some tweets that need more  clarifications.

To take advantage of new vStorage API for vSphere you do not need the new storage, but only the firmware that support the required feature:

  • VAAI can be used also in vSphere 4.1 (only in the Enterprise and Enterprise+ editions)  both with firmware 5.0.x or 5.1.x. With the new 5.1 firmware a new version of VAAI is implemented with a new feature for thin provisioning (but in this case it’s also required vSphere 5).
  • VASA can be used only with vSphere 5 and the new 5.1 firmware, but old with a old Equallogic storage (check controller compatibility for the 5.1 upgrade).
  • The new related software, like for example the EqualLogic Host Integration Tools for VMware 3.1, are not strictly required to use Equallogic in a virtual environment or to use vSphere integration.

See also:

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