Browsing Posts in vSphere

Reading Time: 3 minutes One common way to backup the VMware vCenter Server Appliance (VCSA) is to manage as a common VM and use a backup solution to backup (and restore) the entire VM. But it’s approach does not always work, for example in the case of a database corruption the VM restore could be not working. Starting with vSphere 6.5 and the new VCSA 6.5 was possible to use also a native backup solution integrated with the vCenter Server Appliance Management Interface (VAMI). But it was a manual operation (some scripts are available to automate and schedule it).

Reading Time: 7 minutes Note that this post becomes obsolete with the vSphere 6.7 Update 1 release where the client it’s finally complete. Some months ago I’ve written a post (Is the HTML5-based vSphere Client ready to replace the vSphere Web Client?) on the limitation of the new vSphere Client, but this was before the vSphere 6.7 and vSphere 6.5U2 releases. VMware vSphere, during its history and the different versions, has got several types of Graphical User Interface (GUI) client. One of the most used (not the first, but the standard one since Virtual Infrastructure 3.0) was the vSphere […]

Reading Time: 2 minutes VM Explorer is another backup (and replication) tool with native support for virtualized platforms (vSphere and Hyper-V) with a good success in the SMB segment. Initially was build by a Swiss company (Trilead), acquired later by HP(E) and recently acquired by Microfocus. Lot of changes in the name, but not in the substance and with a good development and release cycles. Now Microfocus has released a new VM Explorer release (v7.1) compatible with the latest version of VMware vSphere 6.7.

Reading Time: 3 minutes VMware vSphere provides a different way to copy the VM data during a backup operation: those modes are called transport modes. There are at least three major transport mode: network mode (or NBD), hot-add mode (or VM proxy mode), SAN mode (of storage offload mode). Most of the backup products can use those different transport modes depending on the configured infrastructure and the requirements.

Reading Time: 2 minutes Funny but related to VMware vSphere 6.5 there aren’t much books and there is nothing specific from VMware Press. There is good documentation from VMware with the new site well structured and very clean (https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-vSphere/index.html), as usual, there are a lot of good KB article, some online resources, but no official books.

Reading Time: 2 minutes VMware vSphere 6.7 is in GA since April 2018 (see this post) and the know issues are quite limited. Most of the other VMware and 3rd party products have reach the compatibility this this new release. For example, recently, also Veeam Backup & Replication support for vSphere 6.7 with the new 9.5 update 3a patch.

Reading Time: 3 minutes Meltdown and Spectre remediations can imply not only performance degradation, but also some management issues. For example in how EVC works as described in VMware KB 52085 (Hypervisor-Assisted Guest Mitigation for Branch Target injection). An ESXi host that is running a patched vSphere hypervisor with updated microcode will see new CPU features that were not previously available. These new features will be exposed to all Virtual Hardware Version 9+ VMs that are powered-on by that host. Because these virtual machines now see additional CPU features, vMotion to an ESXi host lacking the microcode or hypervisor […]

Reading Time: 2 minutes VMware vSphere 6.5 it’s quite popolar now, considering the deadline for the version 5.5 in this year and the direct upgrade path from v5.5 to v6.5. But maybe not everybody want to update vSphere 6.5 to Update 2, considering that there will be no upgrade path (yet) to version 6.7 and maybe other minor issues due to the backport of some features.

Reading Time: 3 minutes Note: there is a new version of this article at Adding DellEMC repository to VMware Update Manager. VMware vSphere Update Manager (VUM) enables centralized, automated patch and version management for VMware vSphere and offers support for VMware ESXi hosts, virtual machines, and virtual appliances. For ESXi hosts it can manage both the update and the upgrade workflows, but can also be powerful for adding custom VIB package, like for example new drivers.

Reading Time: < 1 minute This is an article realized for StarWind blog and focused on the pro and cons of an upgrade to vSphere 6.7. See also the original post. Now that VMware vSphere 6.7 has been announced and it’s also available in General Availability (GA), some people may ask if it makes sense upgrade to this version (or when will make sense upgrade to 6.7). Is a GA release ready for a production environment? Or is it mature and stable enough?

Reading Time: 2 minutes Seeams that there is an issue in CPU hot-add on Windows Server 2016 running in VMware vSphere 6.5, but it’s something hard to reproduce this issues on a different systems. Because on most systems it works correctly, but, at least in a case, the CPU hot add does not work as expected.

Reading Time: 2 minutes VMware has just released the new vSphere 6.7 only a few weeks ago, but now it’s the turn to update the previous version: vSphere 6.5 Update 2 is now available, with some interesting news. New builds will be 8307201 for vCenter and 8294253 for ESXi. The official vSphere documentation is already updated to vSphere 6.5U2 version. All PDFs could be downloaded from this link. The interesting aspect is that vSphere 6.5U2 includes some backported features from vSphere 6.7!

Reading Time: 4 minutes The new VMware vSphere 6.7, recently available in GA, increase all configuration maximums to new limits (compared to the v6.5 and previous versions). Maybe we can say with no limit, or at least, to be serious, with really huge numbers compared to the actual needs and the existing compunting power. Those new limits are both for scalability aspect, but also to fit with possible performance requirements, considering that a bigger number of business critical applications are going in the virtual environment.

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