Finally, after a lot of weeks of waiting, is arrived (at 22.25) the results of the VCP5 beta exam:

Congratulations!  You have passed the new VMware Certified Professional on vSphere 5 (VCP5) certification exam. Thank you for your participation in the beta exam.  Your input and participation were invaluable to this process.

We will be adding this certification to your transcript within the next three weeks.  You will receive an email notification with additional instructions once your education transcript has been updated.  Physical certificates will be sent after your shipping address has been confirmed.  Please contact certification@vmware.com if you do not receive your notification.  Please include your Candidate ID from your exam score report.

Thank you for participating in the VMware Certified Professional on vSphere 5 (VCP5) beta exam and congratulations once again on becoming one of the first VCP5s!

Also the VUE site report this result:

continue reading…

For a list of all objectives see the VCP5 page.

Objective 5.2 – Plan and Implement VMware Fault Tolerance

See also this similar post: VCP 5 – Objective 5.2 – Plan and Implement VMware Fault Tolerance

Note that VMware FT is quite still the 1.0 version with the same constraints of a vSphere 4.1 version.

Identify VMware Fault Tolerance requirements (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Availability guide (page 38) and VMware KB: Processors and guest operating systems that support VMware FT. To check the requirements, there is also a specific tool: VMware SiteSurvey utility.

Configure VMware Fault Tolerance networking (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Availability guide (page 41). A good practice is use a dedicated vmkernel interface enable to FT logging on a dedicated pNIC. Network bandwidth is important to define how much VMs can be protected.

Enable/Disable VMware Fault Tolerance on a virtual machine (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Availability guide (page 45). Study also the different reason on why a VM is in a non protected status (page 46).

Test an FT configuration (same as vSphere 4.x)

See VMware KB: Testing a VMware Fault Tolerance Configuration.

Determine use case for enabling VMware Fault Tolerance on a virtual machine (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Availability guide (page 37). Remember the limit of one vCPU.

For a list of all objectives see the VCP5 page.

Objective 5.1 – Create and Configure VMware Clusters

See also this similar post: Objective 5.1 – Create and Configure VMware Clusters and Objective 5.1 – Create and Configure VMware Clusters.

Describe DRS virtual machine entitlement (similar as vSphere 4.x)

The word entitlement is now usually referred to the vRAM entitlement, but in this context seems to be related on how work the DRS, for more info see the vSphere Resource Management Guide.

Create/Delete a DRS/HA Cluster (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vCenter Server and Host Management Guide (page 57), vSphere Resource Management Guide (page 51), vSphere Availability Guide (page 11).

Add/Remove ESXi Hosts from a DRS/HA Cluster (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vCenter Server and Host Management Guide (page 56 and 113). Note that in order to add a host to an EVC cluster, you must put it in maintenance mode.

Add/Remove virtual machines from a DRS/HA Cluster (similar as vSphere 4.x)

Same of usual VM management. Just be sure that VMs are compliant with cluster requirements, like (for example) be on shared storage.

Configure Storage DRS (new in vSphere 5)

See the vSphere Resource Management Guide (page 77) and the VMware Storage DRS official page.

Configure Enhanced vMotion Compatibility (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vCenter Server and Host Management Guide (page 123) and VMware KB 1003212: Enhanced VMotion Compatibility (EVC) and VMware KB 1005764: EVC and CPU Compatibility FAQ.

Monitor a DRS/HA Cluster (similar as vSphere 4.x)

Understant the vSphere Client (and also the vSphere Web Client) interface.

Configure migration thresholds for DRS and virtual machines (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Resource Management Guide (page 54).

Configure automation levels for DRS and virtual machines (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Resource Management Guide (page 57):

  • Manual -> Initial placement: Recommended host(s) is displayed, Migration: Recommendation is displayed.
  • Partially Automated n Initial placement: Automatic, Migration: Recommendation is displayed.
  • Fully Automated n Initial placement: Automatic, Migration: Recommendation is executed automatically.

Create VM-Host and VM-VM affinity rules (similar as vSphere 4.1)

See the vSphere Resource Management Guide (page 71).

Enable/Disable Host Monitoring (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Availability Guide (page 24).

Enable/Configure/Disable virtual machine and application monitoring (similar as vSphere 4.1)

See the vSphere Availability Guide (page 26). Note that application monitoring need specific API used in the applications.

Configure admission control for HA and virtual machines (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Availability Guide (page 16) and vSphere 5.0 HA: Changes in admission control.

Determine appropriate failover methodology and required resources for an HA implementation (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Availability Guide (page 30).

Read the full story on: http://www.vladan.fr/vmware-vcenter-converter-standalone-5-0-final-available/

The VMware vCenter Converter Standalone 5.0 includes the following new functionality:

  • Full supporto of vSphere 5.
  • Optimized disk and partition alignment and cluster size change.
  • Preserving the LVM configuration on the source machine during Linux conversions.
  • Enhanced synchronization including options for scheduling synchronization tasks and performing multiple synchronization tasks in a conversion job.
  • Conversion data is encrypted between the source and the server.
  • Restoring VCB images.

After the recent change in the certification path for VCP4-DT I’ve got some doubts about the future of the VCA-DT certification (if is no more required for other *-DT certifications, why take it?).

But seems that this kind of certification will remain also in new 5 release (based on View 5 and vSphere 5), because some rumors give the possible release date of new DT certifications:

  • VCA5-DT (estimated availability late 2011)
  • VCP5-DT (estimated availability early 2012)

About the VCAP-DT certification, still there isn’t any official news, both for the v4 and, of course, the v5.

VMware Education has decided to make enhancements to the Desktop Virtualization Certification Program. Effective immediately, VMware Certified Associate 4 – Desktop (VCA4-DT) certification is not a pre-requisite for the VMware Certified Professional 4 – Desktop (VCP4-DT) exam.

For the new path see the official VCP-DT page.

All other requirements for the Desktop Certification Program remain the same: for the VCAP-DT certification (still no news about it and when the beta will start) require the VCP-DT (and also the VCP certification, but this was already required for the VCP-DT).

Why of this change? Maybe because there are really few VCP-DT people? Or just to simplify the certification path? IMHO at this point the VCA-DT certification will loose his role and utility.

For a list of all objectives see the VCP5 page.

Objective 4.4 – Administer Virtual Machines and vApps

See also: VCP 5 Objective 4.4 – Administer Virtual Machines and vApps.

Identify files used by virtual machines (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 9).

Identify locations for virtual machine configuration files and virtual disks (same as vSphere 4.x)

By default all related VM’s files are in a folder (and the name of this folder is usually the initial VM name). But vmdk can simple created or relocated (with a Storage Migration) on other datastores. About the swap and snapshot files see:

Identify common practices for securing virtual machines (same as vSphere 4.1)

See the final release of the vSphere 4.1 Security Hardening Guide.

Hot Extend a virtual disk (same as vSphere 4.x)

Introduced in ESX 3.5 Update 2, with this feature you can increase the size of a vmdk of a running VM (does not require any specific license and work also on the free hypervisor). But then you have to extend the guest filesystem in the VM.

For Windows see: How to expand a VMDK and extend a partition in for VMware ESX. Note that diskpart does not work on system disk on Windows 2000/2003 or XP (use Dell Extpart instead) and that starting from Vista it possible handle the extend also from the GUI (using the Disk Management snap-in).

Configure virtual machine options (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 11 and 80).

Configure virtual machine power settings (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 171).

Configure virtual machine boot options (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 173). Can also be done from the vSphere Web Client.

Configure virtual machine troubleshooting options (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 176). Can also be done from the vSphere Web Client.

Assign a Storage Policy to a virtual machine (new in vSphere 5)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 131).

Verify Storage Policy compliance for virtual machines (new in vSphere 5)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 131).

Determine when an advanced virtual machine parameter is required (similar as vSphere 4.x)

There are advances parameters that can be edited inside the vmx file, or simple the advanced virtual machine options (like Mem/CPU hotplug, Boot Options, Fibre Channel NPIV, …).

In both cases those parameters must be used only when really needed.

Adjust virtual machine resources (shares, limits and reservations) based on virtual machine workloads (similar as vSphere 4.1)

See the vSphere Resource Management Guide.

For a list of all objectives see the VCP5 page.

Objective 4.3 – Manage Virtual Machine Clones and Templates

See also: Objective 4.3 – Manage Virtual Machine Clones and Templates.

Identify the vCenter Server managed ESXi hosts and Virtual Machine maximums (new in vSphere 5)

See also: Configuration Maximums for VMware vSphere 5.0. Main differences from vSphere 4.1:

  • Virtual Machine Maximums: 32 vCPU (instead of 8 ) and 1 TB vRAM (instead of 255 GB)
  • ESXi Host Maximums: 512 VM per host (instead of 320), 2048 vCPU per host (instead of 512), 2 TB RAM (instead of 1 TB), 256 NFS mounts per host (instead of 64)
  • vCenter Server Maximums: quite the same of v 4.1
  • VUM Maximums: more concurrent operations

Identify Cloning and Template options (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 43).

Different choices for the destination: which cluster or host, which datastore, which VMDK type, perform a customization (guest OS reconfiguration), power on and/or edit the VM Properties.

Clone an existing virtual machine (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 44). Can also be done from the vSphere Web Client.

Create a template from an existing virtual machine (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 47).

Deploy a virtual machine from a template (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 50). Can also be done from the vSphere Web Client.

Update existing virtual machine templates (same as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 53 and 55).

Deploy virtual appliances and/or vApps from an OVF template (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 68).

Import and/or Export an OVF template (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 68 and 70).

Determine the appropriate deployment methodology for a given virtual machine application (similar as vSphere 4.x)

See the vSphere Virtual Machine Administration Guide (page 15).

VMware has announced that VMworld 2012 US will be back again at the Moscone Conference Center in San Francisco.

The VMworld 2012 conference will run 27th August through to the 30th August 2012.

VMware are announcing this week that there is now a new option (time limited) available for a VCP3 holder to update their certification to VCP5:

  • until the end of Feb, 2012 it’s possible attend at the vSphere 5: What’s New and then simple pass the VCP5 exam.

For more info see the VCP5 official page.

For more info:

© 2017 © 2013 vInfrastructure Blog | Hosted by Assyrus