Browsing Posts in vDesign

Reading Time: 4 minutes I’m very proud and honored to have been invited at the second Security Field Day (#XFD2) event. This is a brand new Tech Field Day (TFD) event, the Tech Field Day team started the Security Field Day event because they recognized that security is just as vital to IT operations as storage, networking, or virtualization. And of course there is more demand on those type of topics. You can learn more in this post by Tom Hollingsworth: Security Field Day – The Non-Conference.

Reading Time: 4 minutes The 2018 was the year of the CPU related threats, starting with the Meltdown and Spectre bugs affecting several processors, but with most of issues related to Intel based CPU. Unfortunately, this was only the beginning and many other bugs were discovered later. And we’re probably just at the tip of the iceberg.

Reading Time: 4 minutes Most people probably already know the terms Converged infrastructures (CI) and HyperConverged Infrastructures (HCI) that are both become quite common in the IT world, with several products and solutions that aim to be fit in those classifications. With the addition of new terms, like composable infrastructures. But HCI has become a hot topic with several vendors that aim to be a leader in this area, or with several “magic quadrants” that try to define who is in. And most people say that HCI market will just eat all (or most) of the primary storage market.

Reading Time: 1 minute The last week I’ve realized a new article for the StarWind blog focused on the different types of storage controllers in VMware vSphere (see Storage Controllers in VMware vSphere). To access block-based devices (like virtual disks, CD/DVD-ROM), but also generic SCSI devices, a virtual machine uses storage controllers, which at least one is added by default when you create the virtual machine and the type of it depends by the type of guest OS that you have chosen. You can make several change changes while you are in the creation wizard.

Reading Time: 3 minutes The 140 series of Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are U.S. government computer security standards that specify requirements for cryptography modules. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) issues the 140 Publication Series to coordinate the requirements and standards for cryptographic modules which include both hardware and software components for use by departments and agencies of the United States federal government. The requirements cover not only the cryptographic modules themselves but also their documentation and (at the highest security level) some aspects of the comments contained in the source code.

Reading Time: 3 minutes NAKIVO is continuing releasing new versions of its main product, and now, after NAKIVO Backup & Replication v8.0  there is the new v8.1 release which introduces a breakthrough solution for data protection automation. This latest version of the software revolutionizes the way businesses manage their data protection routines by reducing manual work to a minimum. In addition, v8.1 provides for universal recovery of any application objects.

Reading Time: 3 minutes This year has started with the revelation of the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities afftecting most of the (old and new) processors including Intel, AMD and ARM… but also others. In little less than one year we are still far from the solution because there are some patches, but those patches have serious performance impacts and sometimes are those patches require more and more time to become effective (instead of causing new issues).

Reading Time: 2 minutes Announced during the last OpenIO Summit 2018, the new release OpenIO SDS 18.10 has been announced. OpenIO SDS transforms commodity servers into large object storage and compute pools. They build a scalable solution designed to grow as you need, that can handle from terabytes to petabytes. This Object Storage solution became Open Source in 2012 (with AGPLv3 license). OpenIO is a pure (open) software object store. Usually OpenIO SDS has a 6-month release cycle and now following the OpenIO SDS 18.04 released in August 2018, this new version version of SDS is now available with a […]

Reading Time: 4 minutes Now that Network Virtualization and Software Defined Network are becoming mainstream, there is a new trend in networking: Software-Defined WAN (SD-WAN). What is SD-WAN? SD-WAN is best defined as traffic monitoring and management from physical devices to the application itself, capitalizing on flexibility and agility. This intelligent routing is abstracted into a virtual overlay, enabling a secured pooling of both private and public connections allowing for automation, centralized network control and real-time management across multiple links. 

Reading Time: 2 minutes Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) is an interesting way to improve network connections and bandwith by providing a direct memory access from the memory of one system  into that of another. Compared to the full TCP/IP stack, RDMA can be managed without involving either one’s operating system (OS) and this means saving host resources and speed-up the communication. RDMA permits high-throughput and low-latencynetworking, but more important is becoming a common feature on some network card, and also supported by different OSes and hypervisors.

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